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Scam targeting attorneys reported in Michigan

Multiple Michigan attorneys reported recently they have been contacted as part of an apparent scam targeting law firms.

The scam, which has been well documented already in Texas, involves a fraudulent check or wire transfer.

In the Michigan cases, the attorneys received emails from a person claiming to need help with a commercial lease.

The emails came from someone claiming to be with Compass Upstream Services LLC, a company name that appears frequently in the ongoing list of scams compiled by the State Bar of Texas.

Michigan State Police recommend that attorneys who have been targeted in a scam should contact the Michigan Cyber Command Center at MC3@michigan.gov.


Cannabis research center opens at Upper Peninsula university

SAULT STE. MARIE (AP) — A university in Upper Michigan has opened a 2,600-square-foot-center for training and research related to the expanding cannabis industry.

Lake Superior State University, which announced a cannabis chemistry program last year, held the ribbon cutting for the new Cannabis Center of Excellence on Friday, according to The Mining Journal.

University officials have deemed it as a way to train undergraduate students as “job-ready chemists, with hands-on, innovative experience using state-of-the-art instrumentation and industry protocols," according to a news release.

Michigan allows marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, which became legal in December.


Supreme Court won’t hear case brought by author Jon Krakauer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The educational records of a star University of Montana quarterback accused of rape will remain confidential after the Supreme Court declined to get involved in the case brought by author Jon Krakauer.

Krakauer had made a public records request for the documents in 2014 while writing the book “Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town.”

But Montana officials denied him access to the documents related to former University of Montana quarterback Jordan Johnson, who was accused of rape by an acquaintance in 2012.

Krakauer, the author of “Into the Wild” and “Into Thin Air,” took officials to court over their denial.

A lower court initially ordered Krakauer be given access to the records but the Montana Supreme Court disagreed.

Johnson was ultimately acquitted in court but a university disciplinary process had recommended expelling him. Johnson appealed his expulsion to State Commissioner of Higher Education Clayton Christian.

It wasn’t clear what action Christian took but Johnson remained a student. Krakauer wanted documents related to Christian’s intervention.

As is typical, the court didn’t comment Monday in turning away the case.

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