'Rule of Law' exhibit highlights fundamental principle

Students got first look on Constitution Day

On Constitution Day, Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Stephen J. Markman and State Court Administrator Milton L. Mack, Jr., presented a new exhibit about the Rule of Law concept in the Learning Center at the Michigan Hall of Justice. Eighth-grade students from GEE Edmonson Academy in Detroit were welcomed as the first visitors to experience the new exhibit, followed by a guided tour of the Learning Center.

“The rule of law, the equal rule of law, ensures that our laws apply equally to all citizens,” said Markman. “We are pleased to present a new exhibit in the remaining space of our Learning Center to recognize this fundamental principle of our system of law and to communicate related aspects to students and others from throughout our state who visit the Center.”

The new exhibit explains what is meant by the rule of law, which Markman described as “perhaps the greatest legacy of our civilization.” The exhibit also illustrates how courts have described the rule of law in their decisions, while encouraging visitors to explore its themes through a series of questions and answers.

Justice Richard Bernstein, who also worked to develop the exhibit, further observed that the rule of law requires that “it is through law that society is enhanced.”

The MSC Learning Center is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tours are free, and typically last 60–90 minutes. Groups of 10 more must schedule in
advance for guided tours; self-guided, walk-in tours are available for smaller groups. The Learning Center offers online resources for educators and students, including lesson plans, educational games—such as “A Day in Court”—and a free e-newsletter.

Constitution Day is an annual observance created by federal law that requires schools to commemorate this historical moment by teaching about the U.S. Constitution on or near September 17—the day it was signed in 1787.

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