Cooley hosts Cardboard Prophets founder in observance of MLK?Day

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In observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day and WMU-Cooley Law School’s Equal Access to Justice Day, the Lansing campus Student Bar Association hosted a discussion with Mike Karl from Cardboard Prophets, a street-based outreach program in Lansing.

Cardboard Prophets’ goal is to tell the stories of those living on the streets and give them second chances through creative ideas. The organization focuses on involving the community to achieve real change for the homeless, as well as helping to restore faith in humanity. During his time on campus, Karl shared the story of when he was homeless, and how his life was changed by the kindness of a man who did not give up on him.

“As I was homeless myself, someone came up and gave me an opportunity,” Karl said. “He gave me that opportunity every day after that. He fed me. He gave me love. He did not give up on me, even when I gave up on myself.”

 Following the presentation, WMU-Cooley students, faculty and staff volunteered for Cardboard Prophets’ “Laundry Thy Neighbor” service project at All Washed Up Laundromat, where they washed and dried the laundry of those in need from the Lansing community. WMU-Cooley students and staff also donated coats, gloves, hats and blankets.

 Additionally, volunteers sorted seeds for the Garden Project - Greater Lansing Food Bank. The Garden Project provides access to land, how-to education, free seeds and plants, tool lending, a networking hub and more so that all community members can have access to fresh healthy food through gardening opportunities. The organization supports a network of nearly 125 community gardens and 400 home gardens, helping to feed over 7,000 people.

Equal Access to Justice Day, as initiated by WMU-Cooley President and Dean Don LeDuc, suspends classes in observance of MLK Day. Students, faculty and staff devote the day to study, reflection and programs on the role of law and lawyers in protecting the right of everyone and assuring equal access to justice.

 

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