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Court: Middle finger protected by the Constitution

TAYLOR (AP) — When it comes to the middle finger, police might need a thicker skin.

A federal appeals court says a Michigan woman's constitutional rights were violated when she was handed a speeding ticket after giving the finger to a suburban Detroit officer in 2017. The decision means a lawsuit by Debra Cruise-Gulyas can proceed.

In a 3-0 decision Wednesday, the court said Taylor Officer Matthew Minard "should have known better," even if the driver was rude.

Minard stopped Cruise-Gulyas and wrote her a ticket for a lesser violation. But when that stop was over, Cruise-Gulyas raised her middle finger.

Minard pulled her over again and changed the ticket to a more serious speeding offense.

Cruise-Gulyas sued, saying her free-speech rights were violated.


Concealed carry legislation vetoed

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has vetoed legislation that would make it easier for nonresidents to get concealed handgun carry permits.

The bill narrowly passed the GOP-controlled General Assembly, but Northam signed the veto on Tuesday.

The bill would have required state police to issue a temporary permit 90 days after receiving an application unless police determined the applicant was disqualified.

Under current law, nonresidents can apply for a five-year concealed carry permit.

Northam, a Democrat, is a strong advocate for greater gun control laws. Republican supporters of the bill are unlikely to get enough support to override the veto.


Students file lawsuit against colleges in bribery scandal

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two college students have filed a lawsuit against the University of Southern California, Yale University and other colleges where prosecutors say parents paid bribes to ensure their children's admission.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco and alleges the students were denied a fair opportunity for admission.

Erica Olsen and Kalea Woods say they were denied a fair opportunity to apply to Yale and USC.

They say the alleged scheme allowed "unqualified students" to be admitted to "highly selective universities."

The lawsuit also named the University of California, Los Angeles, Wake Forest, Georgetown University and others.

More than 50 people were charged earlier this week.


Woman picks matching numbers 30 times to win lottery game

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Virginia woman parlayed a feeling to purchase 30 lottery tickets with the same numbers to win $150,000.

Deborah Brown says she purchased 20 Pick 4 tickets with the numbers 1-0-3-1 after seeing those numbers "a couple of times during the day." She then bought 10 more because she was really feeling it.

The number combination won the Feb. 11 drawing and each ticket was worth $5,000.

Brown says she "nearly had a heart attack."

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