At a Glance ...

Effort to revitalize ski resort faces challenges

MANCELONA (AP) — An effort to revitalize a northern Michigan ski resort is facing financial challenges as the state takes notice of alleged unlicensed operations at the site.

Sam Porter tells the Traverse City Record-Eagle he’s very close to saving Mount Mancelona after failing to keep his claim on the mountain due to missed mortgage payments. He still has the option to buy it.

Porter scooped up the ski hill in 2017 for $450,000 with plans that could help bring an influx of tourist traffic.

The state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs says Mount Mancelona holds no established or pending ski area licensing.

 State officials last week issued a cease and desist order for a Mount Mancelona ski lift.


Students allowed to earn college credits at no cost

ALLEGAN (AP) — High school students in a western Michigan county have the opportunity to earn diplomas and associate degrees or pre-apprenticeships with up to 62 college credits at no cost.

The state’s Talent and Economic Development Department says professors at Lake Michigan College travel to teach at the Early College Allegan County program in Allegan, southwest of Grand Rapids.

The three-year program allows students to extend high school by one year. Upon completion, they are able to transfer credits earned from Lake Michigan College to a four-year university, continue in their apprenticeships or join the workforce.

Early College Allegan County Dean Evy Houser says the program is huge for “underserved populations and first generation college students.”


High court agrees to hear identity theft case

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case that could make it more difficult for states to prosecute identity theft and other crimes.

The high court agreed Monday to take a case out of Kansas that involves the state’s prosecution of people who were using others’ Social Security numbers on employment and other forms.

Kansas’ highest court ruled in 2017 that the state couldn’t prosecute those crimes by relying on information that is on a required federal work authorization form, the I-9. Kansas argued it can prosecute because the same information also appears on state work forms.

Ten states had urged the Supreme Court to take the case.


North Carolina thrift store sells ‘haunted’ furniture for $1K

SALISBURY, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina thrift store has earned $1,000 off a hand-carved bedroom suite that may just be haunted.

News outlets reports Habitat for Humanity Rowan County’s ReStore warned would-be customers that the previous owner reported he and his wife had “continuous nightmares” while the furniture was in their bedroom. Their dogs were also suspicious of the 1950s highboy chest of drawers and canopy bed, as they “would not stop barking at it.”

The store’s director of operations, Elizabeth Brady, says two regular customers were intrigued and paid full price, but didn’t believe the furniture was actually haunted.

As a Christian housing ministry, officials wanted to make a full disclosure to buyers that the furniture was said to be haunted.
 

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